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Model Text: An introduction

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Welcome to this Revit Zone article on Model Text. In this short tutorial we are going to explain what Model Text is, how and why you would typically use it.

In Revit there is fundamentally "two" types of text object. The first is "Annotation Text" and the second is "Model Text". Annotation text is isued to annotate your views, elements, details, etc. It can be either standalone or "connected" to an object by use of a Leader. The main thing to note about annotation text is that it is "view-specific". It only exists in the view in which it is created.

So that's all nice and straightforward to follow. So how about Model Text. Model Text is MUCH more fun! As you may expect it is fully 3D and exists WITHIN your Model! This opens up a whole world of possibilities- all sorts of signage on your buildings, is possible within your Revit model.

So let's run through the use of the tool. For this exercise I am going to place some model text on the pitched roof of my building! So here is my simple building, produced using Revit Architecture....

Now before I add my Model Text, let's just talk about Work Planes. Most elements within Revit need a "Work Plane" on which to refer themselves to (or be hosted by). Model Text is one such element type. So before we can place our Model Text, we need to set the Work Plane accordingly. In our scenario we need to set the Work Plane to the face of the roof pitch.

Select the "Set" button from the Work Plane panel.....

Then under the "Specify a New Work Plane" heading, select "Pick a Plane".....

You can now go ahead and hoever your mouse over the roof pitch. You will note that Revit highlights the planes it finds in a blue border. Go ahead and select this roof face to set the current Working Plane for this view.

Now all we need to do is place our Model Text. The Model Text tool can be found on the "Model" panel of the "Home" tab.....

When you select this tool, you will be presented with an "Edit Text" panel where you can type the text you wish to be created within your Revit model. I'm am going to enter "This is my roof!"....

As soon as you click "OK" your model text is created and is ready to be placed on the plane you previously set using the "Work Plane" tool....

And there we have it! Some Model Text placed on our roof pitch. So what can we do with our Model Text? Well, just as any other Revit Family, it has "Instance" and "Type" parameters. Go ahead and select the Model Text, then check out its Properties....

You will notice that you can control it's thickness, what material it is made from and also what Phase it was created / demolished in.

If you need to vary the actual size of the text (ie it's height) or indeed the font it is created from, you will need to edit the "Type" properties.....

And that completes our introductory look at Model Text within Revit Architecture


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