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Wall Wraps and Wall Closures

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Welcome to this Revit Zone article on Walls Wraps and Wall Closures. In this article we are going to explain what Wall Wrapping is, when it is used and how you can control it. We will also discuss Wall Closures and how you implement them in your own custom insert families.
So without further ado, let's crack on and take a look at Wall Wraps. I am going to explain this by the use of graphical examples- by far the easiest method of explaining most concepts within Revit.
Here is a simple length of wall, straight out of the default Revit Metric Library.......
The Wall Type that I have used here is "Basic Wall Exterior-Render on Brick on Block". I have chosen this Wall Type as it has quite a few layers within its composition. This is great for helping us to look at the concept of Wall Wraps. You will notice that at each end of the wall, each layer just stops- as if the whole wall had come out of a sausage-making machine. The wall appears as one long extrusion.
In reality when we build walls in real life, very rarely are they actually constructed in this manner. More usually, the various layers that make up the wall are "returned" at openings (ie doors, windows, vents, etc) and at their ends. This is to both close any cavities that are present in the wall and also to tidy-up their visual appearance.
Luckily Revit has the ability to tidy-up the layers in a wall each time they encounter an opening or wall end. This function is called "Wall Wrapping". Let's take a look at this in practice.
I am now going to drop a default window into our wall and we can then see how Revit treats the wall layers where they meet our insert. Here's our inserted window component.......
Oh, that's a bit of a disappointment. The window has been inserted into the wall, but every wall layer has just been cut-through. Nothing has really happened. Let's find out why. First I am going to select the Wall, and then in the Properties Panel I am going to select "Edit Type"......
The top section of the Type Properties panel (for our selected Wall) is related to "Construction". If we look at this section we can see that we have Parameters for "Wrapping at Inserts" and "Wrapping at Ends".....
You will notice that these two Parameters are set to "Do not wrap" and "None" respectively. As you have probably just guessed- this is why our wall layers do not currently do anything interesting at the ends of the wall or where they meet an insert (door, window, etc).
Let's take a look at what options we have for each of those parameters. Starting with "Wrapping at Inserts".....
The choices we have are "Do not wrap", "Exterior", "Interior" or "Both". Obviously we know what "Do not wrap" does! But what about the other options. Well, "Exterior" tells Revit to 'wrap' all the layers on the Exterior side of the wall back to the "Wall Closure" line. Let's see this in practice by changing the Parameter to "Exterior".....
If you look carefully near the top of the image you will see that the outer most layer (Render) has been returned in towards the centre of the Wall. Now you may well be asking at this point "what controls how far the layers are returned?" Don't worry! We are going to cover that in detail. But before we do, let's try a different value for our parameter. Let's now try "Interior"........
OK. Now the exterior layer has 'unwrapped' itself and the inner most layer has wrapped upwards. If we select "Both" as our value for the parameter- both outer most and inner most layers will wrap and actually meet......
But what about all the other layers in the wall, I hear you ask- they didn't wrap! The reason for this is because the second layer in (from the interior) is a "core" layer. Any layer that is in the "Core Zone" within the wall structure 'cannot' wrap. To better explain this, lets take a look at the structure of our wall type......
In fact every layer (that can be) is set to Wrap, for this particular Wall Type. You notice that there is a simple check box in the "Wraps" column- this determines whether each layer wraps to the "Wall Closure" line or not. You will also notice that the check box for any layer in the "Core" zone is greyed out because (as we said above) these cannot Wrap.
Before we take a look at Wall Closures, let's take one last look at our layer wraps to ensure you understand exactly what is going on. Take a look at the image below....
Why does the render layer stop short and not go to the top of the brick layer? Well, it's because of where the "Wall Closure" Reference Plane is set. I have marked on the location of the Wall Closure Reference Plane with a blue line, for your information.
The Wall Closure Plane is part of the insert family and "not" part of the wall. Another way of saying that is.... the Reference Plane (that determines exactly where layers wrap to) is contained within the family that is inserted into the wall- ie a door family, window family, etc.
If the insert family does "not" contain a "Wall Closure" Reference Plane (and they don't have to), then any layer wraps will return to wall centreline by default.
To see where we set the Wall Closure position, let's go ahead and edit our door family.....
In the above image, you can clearly see the Reference plane which determines the Layer Wrap position. If I select the reference plane in question and take a look at its properties......
....you will see that it has been named "Closure" (it could have been called anything in reality) and more importantly, it's "Wall Closure" parameter has been checked.
If you are creating your own custom insert components (door, window, duct opening, etc) and you need the wall to wrap to a certain point (windows and doors are classic examples) then you need to control this position by including a Reference Plane in you r family which has this parameter checked. This will then tell Revit how far to wrap the wall layers, each time they meet the insert.

 


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