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Openings: By Face

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Thursday, 08 September 2011 11:04

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

In this article we are going to look at the Revit Architecture tool “Openings: By Face”. We will see where the tool is located, how it is used (with a quick step-by-step example) and then finally talk about some situations in which you may need to use this tool.

The “Openings: By Face” tool can be found on the “Home” menus, in the “Openings” tab….

Read more: Openings: By Face

   

Walls: Applying Functions to Compound Layers

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Tuesday, 05 July 2011 15:40

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

In this article we will introduce the concept of Compound Layers within Revit Wall structures. Specifically, we will look at the 5 hard-wired Layer Functions (6 if you count the “Membrane” layer which typically has a thickness of 0). And to round off we will take a look at how the “Priority” system works, with regards the Layer Functions. If you are very new to Revit, I would strongly suggest you take a quick look at this article first, which gives a basic overview of Walls within Revit Architecture.

 

In real life walls are very rarely built-up from a single layer of material. Normally, they consist of many layers, each of a different material and performing a different function. Some layers are there to form a structural support for floors or roofs, other layers serve to form an insulation or moisture barrier function.

Read more: Walls: Applying Functions to Compound Layers

   

Building Maker: Curtain System by Face

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Monday, 04 July 2011 16:05

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

In this article I am going to take you (step-by-step) through the process of using Revit Architecture’s Building Maker tools to create a Curtain System directly from the faces of a mass element. If the term “Building Maker” means nothing to you, you may wish to take a look at this article first before proceeding.

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Building Maker: A basic introduction

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Friday, 17 June 2011 20:19

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

This article will give you a basic introduction to Revit Architecture’s “Building Maker” functionality. We will take a look at what the “Building Maker” is and when you would use it. We will also briefly discuss all of the main tools within the “Building Maker” (Detailed instructions on how to use each of the tools will be covered in separate articles)

 

 

So what exactly is the “Building Maker”? Well, if you have read this article you will know that Revit Architecture contains some pretty powerful tools for forming and editing “Conceptual Mass Forms”. This is all well and good but these forms are a long way off from representing real-world building elements. It would be a real shame (and a huge waste of time) if after creating our conceptual massing study, we had to start all over again modelling walls, floors, roofs, etc.

 

Read more: Building Maker: A basic introduction

   

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