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Building Maker: A basic introduction

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Friday, 17 June 2011 20:19

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

This article will give you a basic introduction to Revit Architecture’s “Building Maker” functionality. We will take a look at what the “Building Maker” is and when you would use it. We will also briefly discuss all of the main tools within the “Building Maker” (Detailed instructions on how to use each of the tools will be covered in separate articles)

 

 

So what exactly is the “Building Maker”? Well, if you have read this article you will know that Revit Architecture contains some pretty powerful tools for forming and editing “Conceptual Mass Forms”. This is all well and good but these forms are a long way off from representing real-world building elements. It would be a real shame (and a huge waste of time) if after creating our conceptual massing study, we had to start all over again modelling walls, floors, roofs, etc.

 

Read more: Building Maker: A basic introduction

   

Modelling flat roofs that are not quite flat

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Thursday, 16 June 2011 14:18

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

The term “flat roof” can be a bit of an anomaly- because the majority of flat roofs are not quite flat. They are either built–up off an inclined sub-structure (ie the roof joists are slightly inclined, or firing pieces are added to them) or the insulation layer is tapered, to provide a slight fall (ie as with tapered cork insulation).

So how does all this relate to Revit? As you probably well know, Revit has the ability to define a flat roof element, comprised of different material layers. By default, each layer in this “sandwich” is of a uniform thickness. Consequently, the whole assembly has a completely horizontal top and bottom surface.

Read more: Modelling flat roofs that are not quite flat

   

Doors: Creating your own Door Family: Part 7

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Wednesday, 15 June 2011 19:34

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

Welcome to the final part in this series of articles in which we have explained how to create your own Door Family using the Family Editor, in Revit Architecture. If you have missed the previous parts in this series, you may wish to start here.

In this article we are going to take a very quick overview of all the key concepts that we have covered in the previous 6 parts. I’m not going to go in to detail here, as we did that in the respective sections. What I would like you to take away from this article is a thorough understanding of the key concepts, the thought processes and overall workflow.

Read more: Doors: Creating your own Door Family: Part 7

   

Doors: Creating your own Door Family: Part 6

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Tuesday, 14 June 2011 20:02

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

Welcome to the sixth part in this series of articles in which we explain how to create your own Door Family using the Family Editor, in Revit Architecture. If you have missed the previous parts in this series, you may wish to start here.

If you have been following the series from the start, you will know that we have now completed the modelling part of the exercise. That is to say, we have created all the 3D geometry that is required to represent our door assembly- including the door handles.

To get the maximum value out of the time we have spent modelling this door, we can go ahead and easily create a number of pre-defined “Types”, all based on the same basic family. Needless to say, that is the focus of this particular article: Types.

Read more: Doors: Creating your own Door Family: Part 6

   

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