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Silhouette Styles

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Monday, 24 January 2011 16:27

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

With regards graphical presentation, Revit sometimes receives criticism that its output is a little too sterile. Sure, it does not produce (out of the box) the “hand sketched” visual style of SketchUp. But there are things you can do within Revit in order to produce drawings that are a little more “easy on the eye”.

 

 

One such technique is to add a “Silhouette Style” to the edges of your model elements. Thankfully Revit has the ability to determine the silhouette for each specific view in your project- be it an elevation, section, perspective, etc.

Read more: Silhouette Styles

   

Topography: Changing the section cut material

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Friday, 21 January 2011 15:28

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

When you take a section through a Toposurface, the default “cut material” that you see is “Site- Earth”….

 

 

But what if you want to change this to something else? It is of course possible- but finding “where” to change the setting can sometimes prove frustrating to new users.

 

In order to find the parameter, you need to click on the little arrow at the base of the “Model Site” tab- located in the “Massing & Site” menu…….

Read more: Topography: Changing the section cut material

   

Roofs: Using Slope Arrows

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Thursday, 20 January 2011 16:55

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

The default method of creating a sloped roof within Revit Architecture is to make one or more of the roof boundary lines “Slope Defining”. This is fine if we know what angle we want the roof slope to be at. But what if we want to create a roof based on absolute heights? For example: We know the height at the eaves and we know the height that the ridge needs to be.

 

 

Yes, we could always use trigonometry to calculate the slope. But there’s no need for that. We just use Slope Arrows!

Read more: Roofs: Using Slope Arrows

   

Forms: Creating a Surface

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Wednesday, 19 January 2011 15:15

Please Note: If you're new to Revit, you may be interested in my "Beginner's Guide to Revit Architecture" 84 part video tutorial training course. The course is 100% free with no catches or exclusions. You don't even need to sign-up. Just enjoy the course and drop me line if you found it useful. The full course itinerary can be viewed here

 

 

In this article we are going to take a look at how to create a Surface form, from within the Conceptual Design Environment. If you are totally new to the Conceptual Design Environment (or CDE) within Revit, I suggest that you may wish to read this article first.

 

 

In other articles we have looked at how to create solid 3D forms such as Lofts, Sweeps and Revolves. But we can also use the “Create Form > Solid Form” tool to create a solid planar surface.

 

Compared with the other solid forms we have looked at, this one is by far the easiest to create- which means this article is going to be pretty short!.

Read more: Forms: Creating a Surface

   

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