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Matchlines

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Welcome to the Revit Zone article on Matchlines. In this article we are going to take a look at what Matchlines are, within Revit. We are going to show you how to produce them and also when you would want to use them.

So what exactly are Matchlines? Matchlines are basically sketch lines that are used to show where a view is split. Matchlines are most commonly used in conjunction with "Dependent Views". If you are yet conversent with "Dependent Views" in Revit, you can find a couple of introductory articles HERE and HERE.

 

So let's just dive in with an actual example of a Matchline in use. This will probably be the best way to explain what they are and why you would use them. Let's start off by creating a large floor plan. Here is one......

For the sake of this example, we're not concerned with what the plan looks like- just that it is a large building plan that we wish to split into two seperate zones.
To do this we need to create two "Dependent Views". As stated above, refer to this article for  instruction on creating Dependent Views in Revit. If we look at at the Porject Browser, we can now see that I have a Primary View and two associated Dependent Views.....

I now need to take each of the Dependent Views in turn and resize the Crop Regions to just show the area I wish to depict for each zone. Once I have done this I can go to the "Primary View" and (as long as I have "Crop Regions" displayed) I can see the crop regions (shown dotted) for each of my Dependent Views. The image below is of the "Primary View"- you can clearly see the 2 crop regions dividing the plan up into two zones.....

So I'm now ready to place each of these views onto a seperate sheet- effectively splitting the plan into two seperate areas- which we wish to detail / annotate seperately. All we need is a line to clearly define where this split occurs. A Matchline! That should do the trick. Let's add out Matchline now. We find the Matchline tool on the View Menu, in the "Sheet Composition" tab...

If we select the Matchline tool, Revit immediately enters the all-too familiar "Sketch Mode"....

You will notice the Draw pallete is pretty sparse! It's either "Draw a straight line" or "Pick a Line". Let's go ahead and sketch out our Matchline....

You will note that I've placed my Matchline on the centreline of an internal wall. This neatly splits the building so that all rooms fall either within one zone or another. All I need to do now is go ahead and click on the "Big Green Tick" in order to complete the sketch and place the Matchline. And here is the finished Matchline.....

You can now see our Matchline- depicted as a thick blue dashed line. We can of course alter the way this is drawn either by "Object Styles" (which sets the visual parameters for all Matchlines) or by the use of "Graphic Overrides" to control Matchline appearance on a view-by-view basis.

Now that we have our Matchline in place, we can simply place our Dependent Views onto different sheets. Here is one of our views.....

For the sake of clarity (in the above image) I have applied a "Graphics Override" to beef-up the thickness of the Matchline and colour it red, instead of the default black. Before we finish, there are a couple of other things to say about Matchlines. Let's take a look at a Level 2 Plan....

YES! Our Matchline shows up in other views. So it's NOT a "View-specific" annotation. NO, It's NOT a Detail Line. Matchlines transcend through all levels of your model, UNLESS you don't want them to. SO how do we control what levels the Matchlines appear on? We simply select the Matchline and use it's parameters to set the vertical limits....

And that's it for Matchlines. Although obviously limited in their use, you will see that if you do need to show a break in your views- Revit has a tool for the job!


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